Pork Production Methods

Lidl’s Pork Method of Production Labelling Initiative

Britain has some of the highest pig production standards in the world, with over 40% of the pork being grown in outdoor-based systems. At Lidl, we support this production system with our range of Outdoor Bred Deluxe Sausages. All of our fresh pork and sausages are grown to either the Red Tractor or RSPCA assurance standards, ensuring that all pigs within our supply chain:

  • have constant access to enrichment (including straw, toys and wood)
  • are free from castration
  • are closely monitored for health and welfare indicators

At Lidl, we have made this information even clearer for our customers with our new pork Welfare Window initiative. We are the first UK retailer to provide this information directly on our pork products, helping customers to make a more informed choice when they purchase pork in our stores.

More information on the Red Tractor Pig Standard can be found here.

Pork Production Methods

Further Information:

Method of Production

Indoor

British Indoor

British Outdoor Bred

British Outdoor Reared

British Free Range

British Organic

Space Allowance

Stocking density as per legal requirements 

Indoor housing: 0.15-1.0 m² minimum per pig (depending on weight)

1.64-6m² minimum per adult pig (depending on group size and composition) 

Indoor housing: 0.15-1.0 m² minimum per pig (depending on weight) 

RSPCA: 0.5-1.72 m² minimum per growing pig (bedding materials typically straw). 2.7-7.5 m² minimum per adult pig (depending on group size and composition)

Indoor housing: 0.15-1.0 m² minimum per pig (depending on weight) 

RSPCA: 0.5-1.72 m² minimum per pig (bedding materials typically straw). 2.7-7.5 m² minimum per adult pig (depending on group size and composition)

Shelters: 0.15-1.0 m² minimum per pig (depending on weight)

Outdoor area: 12-40 m² minimum per pig (depending on management system). 2.7-7.5 m² minimum per adult pig (depending on group size and composition) 

Shelters: 0.6-1.3 m² minimum per pig (depending on weight)

Outdoor area: 0.4-0.8 m² minimum per pig (depending on weight)   

Animal Welfare/ Environmental Enrichment 

Access to environmental enrichment materials 

Castration is permitted

Routine tail docking and teeth reduction not permitted*

*unless justified by vet

Access to range of environmental enrichment materials such as straw, toys and wood to encourage pigs' inquisitive nature

Castration, routine tail docking* and teeth reduction are not permitted

*unless justified by vet

Access to environmental enrichment such as straw, hay and saw dust

Castration and tail docking* are not permitted

*unless justified by RSPCA and vet 

Access to environmental enrichment such as straw, hay and saw dust

Castration and tail docking* are not permitted

*unless justified by RSPCA and vet 

Access to environmental enrichment such as straw, hay and saw dust

Additional objects such as footballs can be considered

Castration and tail docking are not permitted

Constant access to fields for duration of life span

Access to environmental enrichment such as straw, hay and soil

Castration, teeth clipping, tail docking and nose ringing are prohibited*

GM free diet

*unless justified by vet

Farrowing

Farrowed indoors

Confinement systems are allowed

Farrowed indoors

Confinement systems are allowed

Free farrowing

Zero confinement

Free farrowing

Zero confinement

Free farrowing

Zero confinement

Free farrowing

Zero confinement

Assurance Partners

N/A

Red Tractor or Quality Meat Scotland

RSPCA Assured

Red Tractor or Quality Meat Scotland

RSPCA Assured

Red Tractor or Quality Meat Scotland

RSPCA Assured

Red Tractor or Quality Meat Scotland

Organic Farmers & Growers

EU Organic Label

Red Tractor or Quality Meat Scotland 

 

CASE STUDY: Managing the Soil of British Outdoor Pigs

Farmers that grow pigs and sows on an outdoor production system need to work closely to protect the natural environment and ensure that the quality of their soils are maintained and not degraded.

Sows spend their entire lives outside and enjoy foraging in the soils. This means that pig farmers need to carefully manage their fields to keep both their pigs happy and their natural environment protected.

Within outdoor production systems, fields must be closely inspected before allowing pig production to take place. Fields must be well-draining to prevent waterlogging and farmers are encouraged to consult soil scientists and agronomists to ensure that the soil quality is kept in good condition. One of the ways farmers do this is to make sure that fields are rotated every two years, resting a field for at least 6 months to allow recovery from pig production.